Disciplinary Hearings for Juveniles in New Jersey

Morris County Criminal Lawyer

Under New Jersey law, juvenile offenders become eligible for parole consideration after they have served one-third of their prison sentence, with the exception of cases where the juvenile offender has been denied the eligibility for parole. However, it's important to note that parole eligibility does not mean that parole will be granted. Because there is a lot riding on your son or daughter's hearing, it's important to seek legal representation from a Morris County criminal defense attorney from The Law Offices of Christopher G. Porreca, P.C.

The Hearing Process

The Initial Hearing
With the initial hearing, the hearing officers from the Division of Release will conduct a preliminary review of the inmate's progress for parole release. The hearing officers will closely review the inmate's criminal history, as well as their social, physical, educational and psychological progress. The hearing officers will also examine the inmate's psychological risk and needs assessment. From there, the hearing officers will summarize the case for the designated board Members review.

The Panel Hearing
Next, the inmate appears before the Board Panel (this is a two-member panel of Board members), and it is up to these folks to either grant or deny parole. It's important to understand that the information about the crime is a critical factor in the Board Panel's decision-making process. During this hearing, crime victims are allowed to present testimony, or they may submit their comments to the Board in writing. During this process, the inmate is not informed about whether any victims submitted any written or oral testimony.

The Board Panel will consider all of the relevant factors when decided whether or not to grant parole including the nature of the crime, the inmate's progress, any victim testimony or comments and the inmate's testimony. If the Board Panel decides to deny parole, they will set a Future Eligibility Term (FET). The FET establishes when the inmate is eligible for future parole consideration.

If the Board Panel decides to grant parole, the Panel may set forth additional conditions to which the parolee must abide by, over and above the normal standards for all parolees. Such conditions may include: random drug tests, substance abuse counseling, and they may require that the parolee obtain gainful employment.

School Board Hearings in Morris County

In addition to juvenile hearings, I can also represent your son or daughter at a School Board Hearing. Students facing a long-term suspension will have a formal hearing scheduled. All students have a right to have an attorney present at a formal hearing conducted before the district board of education. The formal hearing is to take place no later than 30 calendar days following the day the student was suspended.

At the formal hearing, the district board will evaluate all evidence and witness testimony and it will listen to the student's version of the events in question. Considering the fact that a student's educational future is on the line, it's vital to have an attorney defending their case during the formal hearing. At this hearing, I will carefully prepare a compelling defense on your son or daughter's behalf and I will challenge any evidence presented against your son or daughter. As an experienced criminal defense lawyer, I am fully prepared to represent minors at any type of juvenile hearing in Morris County and the surrounding areas. Contact my firm to discuss your case and to learn more about your defense options.

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